Guest Post: The Top 10 Latent Defects in Home Inspections

We are excited to have one of the sharpest Home Inspectors with us today! Say hello to Daniel Fedosenko of Mr. Home Inspector Ltd! Daniel has been in the industry for a number of years and has a wealth of knowledge when it comes to home inspections. From Vancouver to Hope and everywhere in between they are helping homeowners check off all the boxes when it comes to home inspections. So without further ado, take it away Danny!

I have worked with Alistair Young and his team for a number of years. At Mr. Home Inspector our goal is to:

  • Offer solutions to issues/challenges (not just reported problems)
  • Go above and beyond the call of duty, and
  • Provide exceptional customer service in the Lower Mainland (from Squamish to Hope).

Today, we wanted to cover the topic of Latent Defects.  Latent defects are those which would not be revealed by any inquiry which a purchaser is in a position to make before entering the contract. Here are the top 10 Latent Defects that you may miss if you don’t have a proper home inspection done!

  1. Bathing area moisture issues behind tile surrounds: water damage.
  2. Pest infestation in attic, crawlspace, and or living areas: damage and air qulity issues can arise.
  3. Plumbing issue: polybutylene pipes with plastic fittings 1978-1995 years installed. Water damage and insurance issues, extra costs
  4. Hidden water leaks: ceilings, walls, or floors: water damage and extra costs will occur.
  5. Grade levels around homes too high up onto the structure: structural rot and extra costs will occur.
  6. Electrical panel size 60 amps: causes insurance issues and extra costs to upgrade the panel size to minimum 100 amps.
  7. Poor ventilation in attic causes mildew/mold in areas: air quality issues and extra costs to treat area.
  8. Toilet tanks by Crane manufactured between 1980-1991 (tanks prone to crack): water damage
  9. Basement and crawspace water leakage issues: water damage and extra costs to address.
  10. Aluminum wiring 1960’s to 1970’s: expands and contracts and loosens and can cause a fire.

There you have it folks–these 10 defects can be avoided by having a home inspection done before you move into your new home. Get in touch with me and my team today, we promise to help you find any issues and find a solution!

 

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How the Bank of Canada’s Interest Rate Hike Will Affect You and Your Mortgage

On July 12, we saw the first rate hike from the Bank of Canada. The rate was raised 0.25% from 0.5% to 0.75%. This was the first increase since September 2010 and more will come this year.  What do these increases mean for your fixed or variable rate mortgage? 

Mortgages

Your home may be the biggest purchase of your life, and anything that could affect the amount you are paying each month is important.

 

For a Fixed Rate Mortgage:

  • Payments for current homeowners stay the same
    • The interest rate on this type of mortgage is fixed so no matter what the Bank of Canada does, your rate will not change until your mortgage is up for renewal.
  • Increase at mortgage renewal
    • If you are at the end of your mortgages’ term, you will have to renew and your rate will change accordingly. This is not all bad news as the rate that you initially had at the start of your term (typically 5 years) may have been higher than the current rate is—even with the rate increase. To check what your future mortgage payments might be, I suggest using GLM Mortgage Groups’ Mortgage Calculator.
  • Higher Rate for Prospective Homebuyers
    • First-time home-buyers may have a higher rate if they are applying for a mortgage. Remember that the Bank of Canada will raise their rates in small increments (0.25%) at a time. Also, each increase translates into around $13 per $100k—an increase that most people can afford (though it may mean sacrificing a coffee run or two per week).

 

Variable Rate Mortgages

  • Your Payments Will Increase
    • A variable rate mortgage moves up or down with the general level of interest rates in the economy. This recent Bank of Canada hike means your mortgage payments will go up, but the amount you will be paying will be affordable, working out to around $13 per 100k
  • Should you switch to a Fixed Rate?
    • Deciding to lock into a fixed rate mortgage, depends on your ability to handle an increase in interest rates over time.  Historically, borrowers who stay in a Variable Rate Mortgage (VRM) tend to save more money over the course of the term. It is important to make an informed decision and to understand how Variable Rate Mortgages work.  Locking into a fixed rate may cost you more money than what an increase in your VRM would be.

The Mortgage Payment Calculator can show an estimated mortgage payment based on a new rate.

So there is no need to panic about these interest rate increases. It is important to stay informed and to budget for them.  The effect these increases will have on the real estate market remains to be seen.  This increase was the first one since 2010 but as we continue to get information we will keep you updated!  If you have any questions, please contact Young Real Estate Group and we can put you in touch with the best professionals out there to help you navigate these mortgage rate changes.